Mit dem Ziel, die Verbreitung des Coronavirus zu hemmen, gelten in Berlin umfangreiche Abstands- und Hygieneregeln. Weitere Informationen »

Sugar

s and Beyond! Food – Matter – Energy

Image 1
  • Diese Zuckerrohrmühle stammt aus Bolivien und ist über 300 Jahre alt. Sie wurde zur Verkleinerung und zum Pressen von Zuckerrohr verwendet. – Eine große, hölzerne Zuckerrohrmühle. Sie besteht aus einer langen Antriebsstange oben, die eine Antriebswalze zum Rotieren bringt. Diese setzt zwei weitere Walzen in Gang, die das Zuckerrohr auspressen.
    SDTB / C. Kirchner

    Diese Zuckerrohrmühle stammt aus Bolivien und ist über 300 Jahre alt. Sie wurde zur Verkleinerung und zum Pressen von Zuckerrohr verwendet. – Eine große, hölzerne Zuckerrohrmühle. Sie besteht aus einer langen Antriebsstange oben, die eine Antriebswalze zum Rotieren bringt. Diese setzt zwei weitere Walzen in Gang, die das Zuckerrohr auspressen.

  • Das Präparatekabinett zeigt unterschiedliche Nasspräparate von Zuckerrüben, Rohrzuckerstangen und deren Schädlingen und Nützlingen. – Das Präparatekabinett mit großen und kleinen zylindrischen Glasgefäßen. Darin werden Zuckerrüben und Rohrzuckerstangen in Alkohol aufbewahrt.
    SDTB / C. Kirchner

    Das Präparatekabinett zeigt unterschiedliche Nasspräparate von Zuckerrüben, Rohrzuckerstangen und deren Schädlingen und Nützlingen. – Das Präparatekabinett mit großen und kleinen zylindrischen Glasgefäßen. Darin werden Zuckerrüben und Rohrzuckerstangen in Alkohol aufbewahrt.

  • Zucker sind überall! Pflanzen, wie beispielsweise Bäume, bestehen aus der Zuckerverbindung Zellulose. – Eine junge Frau läuft durch den Ausstellungsbereich „Zucker sind überall“. An der Decke befindet sich ein großes hinterleuchtetes Foto. Darauf ist das grüne Blätterdach eines Waldes zu sehen. Am Fußboden befindet sich die Baumscheibe einer Pappel.
    SDTB / H. Hattendorf

    Zucker sind überall! Pflanzen, wie beispielsweise Bäume, bestehen aus der Zuckerverbindung Zellulose. – Eine junge Frau läuft durch den Ausstellungsbereich „Zucker sind überall“. An der Decke befindet sich ein großes hinterleuchtetes Foto. Darauf ist das grüne Blätterdach eines Waldes zu sehen. Am Fußboden befindet sich die Baumscheibe einer Pappel.

Sugar is more than just a sweetener for coffee or tea. There are not many things in the world that do not have something to do with sugar in some way. Discover in our permanent exhibition "Sugars and Beyond! Food – Matter – Energy" the exciting history of this biomolecule!

The exhibition “Sugars and Beyond!” is the new home of the Sugar Museum, which was opened in 1904 in the Institut für Zuckerindustrie (Sugar Industry Institute) in Berlin’s Wedding district. The exhibition showcases the fascinating spectrum of sugar’s applications and the social changes it has set in motion. The “queen of crops,” the sugar beet, stands for the agro-industrial revolution of the past. The future is symbolized by new technologies that use sugar molecules for energy storage, as bioreactors, and as a raw material for 3D printing.

Initially sugar came from sugar cane that grew in overseas colonies. Growing and harvesting sugar was thus closely connected to the exploitation and enslavement of mostly African people. Later, however,  the sugar beet became a source of domestic production. The scientific foundation for cultivating sugar beets was laid in the mid-18th century by two chemists in Berlin, Andreas Sigismund Marggraf and Franz Carl Achard “Sugars and Beyond!” explains how the this innovation led to an economic revolution in agriculture. By the late 19th century beet sugar had become the German Reich’s chief export good. The exhibition also features the machinery that made this possible, from the beet topping plow to the furrow opener to the modern harvester in Ferrari red.

Runtime: from November 2015

Price: €8.00

Reduced price: €4.00

Takes place here:

Similar events

Büste der Königin Nofretete, Neues Reich, 18. Dynastie, Amarna, Ägypten, Um 1340 v. Chr.
© SMB / bpk / Jürgen Liepe

Ancient Egypt

The Egyptian Museum and Papyrus Collection has a chance to present itself on a scale never shown until now, with over 2 500 exhibits on display in the Neues Museum's northern wing over three floors, covering 3600m². more

Order online
Museum Europäischer Kulturen, Ansicht der Dauerausstellung "Kulturkontakte. Leben in Europa", 2011 – Museum Europäischer Kulturen, Ansicht der Dauerausstellung "Kulturkontakte. Leben in Europa", 2011 © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Museum Europäischer Kulturen / Ute Franz-Scarciglia; CC NC-BY-SA
© Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Museum Europäischer Kulturen / Ute Franz-Scarciglia; CC NC-BY-SA

Cultural contacts. Life in Europe

Spread over 700 square metres, the permanent exhibition 'Cultural Contacts. Living in Europe' is the first ever display of a cross-section of all the museum's diverse collections. It examines discussions on social movements and social boundaries. The... more

Order online
Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Potsdamer Platz
© Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Nationalgalerie / Jörg P. Anders

The Art of Society

The Art of Society shows some 250 paintings and sculptures created between 1900 and 1945 by artists including Otto Dix, Hannah Höch, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Lotte Laserstein and Renée Sintenis. more

Order online
Querschnitt durch das Spektrum des Schatzfundes von Neupotz, 2. Hälfte 3. Jh. n. Chr.
© Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Museum für Vor- und Frühgeschichte / Claudia Klein

Treasures from the Rhine: The Barbarian Treasure of Neupotz

For many years the sole occupant of the Neues Museum’s Bacchussaal was the Xanten Boy, a Roman bronze statue discovered in the Rhine near Xanten by fishermen in 1858. Now the bronze youth is being joined by a wealth of other exhibits: iron tools and waggon... more

Order online

The help page for the event calendar answers common questions.. Information about coperations and imprint can be found on our page about partners and terms and conditions.