Communications Engineering

Image 1
  • „Elektropolis Berlin“ zeigt den Aufbruch ins Kommunikationszeitalter. – Eine Ansicht der Ausstellung Nachrichtentechnik. Mehrere Glas-Vitrinen zeigen Radios, in der Mitte steht ein Modell des Vox Hauses.
    SDTB / C. Kirchner

    „Elektropolis Berlin“ zeigt den Aufbruch ins Kommunikationszeitalter. – Eine Ansicht der Ausstellung Nachrichtentechnik. Mehrere Glas-Vitrinen zeigen Radios, in der Mitte steht ein Modell des Vox Hauses.

  • Im Nachbau eines Schwarz-Weiß-Fernsehstudios von 1958 lässt sich die Aufzeichnung einer Nachrichtensendung räumlich nachvollziehen. – Zwei große Kameras und ein Scheinwerfer. An der Wand hängt eine schwarz-weiß Großaufnahme eines Fernsehstudios in den 1950er Jahren.
    SDTB / C. Kirchner

    Im Nachbau eines Schwarz-Weiß-Fernsehstudios von 1958 lässt sich die Aufzeichnung einer Nachrichtensendung räumlich nachvollziehen. – Zwei große Kameras und ein Scheinwerfer. An der Wand hängt eine schwarz-weiß Großaufnahme eines Fernsehstudios in den 1950er Jahren.

  • Interaktive Medienstationen wie diese Hörstation für Rundfunksignale laden zum Mitmachen ein. – Ein Mädchen steht vor einer Medienstation mit Deutschlandkarte und spielt über ein Pult Signale ab.
    SDTB / C. Kirchner

    Interaktive Medienstationen wie diese Hörstation für Rundfunksignale laden zum Mitmachen ein. – Ein Mädchen steht vor einer Medienstation mit Deutschlandkarte und spielt über ein Pult Signale ab.

Elektropolis Berlin: Discover groundbreaking objects from the history of communications technology. Radios, telephones and televisions changed our lives in the 19th and 20th centuries because they fulfilled mankind's ancient desire for unlimited communication.

The exhibition "Elektropolis Berlin" tells the story of communications technology and its influence on Berlin's electrical industry. Visitors to the exhibition can follow Berlin's rapid rise to become the capital of Germany in the six areas of telegraphy, telephony, radio, broadcasting, sound engineering and television: in 1930, 50 percent of the German broadcasting industry and 70 percent of the German electrical industry were based in Berlin.

The audio and visual documents that are an important part of the exhibition can be explored by museum visitors themselves at media stations or using the recreated SFB television studio from 1958. Through seeing, hearing and trying out, it becomes all the clearer how closely technical innovations and the changes in our living environment are connected. News technology made and still makes the lives of people in the "Electropolis Berlin" more pleasant and exciting.

Runtime: from January 2000

Price: €8.00

Reduced price: €4.00

Takes place here:

Similar events

Paul Gauguin (1848-1903), Vahine no te Tiare. The Woman with the Flower, Detail, 1891 – Paul Gauguin (1848–1903), Vahine no te Tiare. The Woman with the Flower, Detail, 1891
© Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek

Paul Gauguin – Why Are You Angry?

Paul Gauguin – Why Are You Angry? at the Alte Nationalgalerie looks at Gauguin’s oeuvre – which was also shaped by Western, colonial ideas of ‘the exotic’ and ‘the erotic’ –, juxtaposing the works with historical material from both Gauguin’s past and... more

Order online
Helmut Newton's Private Property – Raumansicht
Helmut Newton Foundation

Helmut Newton's Private Property

Under the title "Private Property", the Museum of Photography is showing Newton's cameras, its own collection of photographs and art, its library and parts of its Monte Carlo office, as well as numerous publications of Helmut Newton's photographs. more

Order online
Büste der Königin Nofretete, Neues Reich, 18. Dynastie, Amarna, Ägypten, Um 1340 v. Chr.
© SMB / bpk / Jürgen Liepe

Ancient Egypt

The Egyptian Museum and Papyrus Collection has a chance to present itself on a scale never shown until now, with over 2 500 exhibits on display in the Neues Museum's northern wing over three floors, covering 3600m². more

Order online
Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Potsdamer Platz
© Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Nationalgalerie / Jörg P. Anders

The Art of Society 1900–1945

The Art of Society shows some 250 paintings and sculptures created between 1900 and 1945 by artists including Otto Dix, Hannah Höch, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Lotte Laserstein and Renée Sintenis. more

Order online

The help page for the event calendar answers common questions.. Information about coperations and imprint can be found on our page about partners and terms and conditions.