PCR tests probably no longer necessary for infected persons without symptoms

PCR tests probably no longer necessary for infected persons without symptoms

For people with a suspected Coronavirus infection, a PCR test is no longer necessarily required for confirmation, according to the Berlin Senate.

Corona-Warn-App: Kontaktwarnung

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Rapid tests should serve as proof of infection

This was announced by Berlin's Senator for Health Ulrike Gote (Green Party) on Friday (Jan. 21, 2022) to rbb Inforadio. Gote explained that if a person were to test positive with a rapid test done by themselves, but does not show any symptoms, "it will most likely be sufficient to only take an additional rapid test at a testing center." The person would then also receive a corresponding certificate. A rapid test is also normally sufficient to 'test yourself clear' at the end of an infection phase. PCR tests would then only be necessary for people who work in places such as retirement homes, nursing homes and hospitals. In recent days, there had been long queues with hours of waiting time at many PCR test sites.

Contact tracing to focus on critical infrastructure

Contact tracing in the way it was done in the beginning of the pandemic also "can't be done at all any more" Gote said. "We need to focus on other things and keep our critical infrastructure running." It's important, she said, that people who got infected but not severely ill can return to work quickly, and that those at risk would be protected to keep them from becoming severely ill.

Senate decides on continued use of Luca app

Gote stressed that contact tracing would only be important for people who work in nursing homes and hospitals as well as during major outbreaks in schools or daycare centers, for example. "But tracing every contact is no longer possible or necessary," Gote said. As a result, the Luca app would no longer ne urgently needed. According to Gote, tt is likely that the use of the app will not be continued. The Senate will come to a decision on this matter next week.
Publication date: 20. May 2022
Last updated: 21. January 2022

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